Is your hospital safe?

Not all hospitals are the same. In fact, one recent study showed patients who undergo common surgeries are safer at busy hospitals that perform the procedures regularly.

Hospital surgical volume matters

A medical team performing an operationAn article published in U.S. News and World report has shed the light on a little-known surgical risk: inexperience. Extrapolating data from Medicare statistics, the study revealed that hospitals performing only a small number of common surgical procedures place patients at a far greater risk than high-volume hospitals.

How big of a problem is it? “You can save your life by picking the right place,” says Leah Binder, director of the Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit organization that measures hospital safety and performance.

Dr. John Birkmeyer, Professor of Surgery at Dartmouth–Hitchcock Medical Center has estimated that as many as 11,000 deaths could have been prevented nationally if patients who went low-volume hospitals opted to for the highest volume hospitals instead. For example, at one low-volume Colorado hospital, patients were three times more likely to die during hip replacement surgery and 24 times more likely to die during a knee replacement.

Increased risks with low-volume hospitals

According to the study, hip replacement patients who had their surgery in in the lowest-volume hospitals were about 50 percent more likely to die than patients treated at surgical centers in the top 20 percent. Knee replacement patients took a larger gamble using low-volume hospitals, with a nearly 70 percent higher risk of death. Patients with congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease fared somewhat better; however, they still had a 20 percent increased risk of dying.

While these numbers are dramatic, it’s important to remember that volume is only one indicator patients should consider when selecting a healthcare facility. In fact, some low-volume hospitals provide excellent care. Conversely, some high-volume centers may perform unnecessary surgeries.

Choosing a hospital

One of the best ways to make a decision is to ask questions. Here are a few examples:

  1. What procedures do you recommend for my case, and why?
  2. Do I need this surgery? What other options are there?
  3. How many times have you performed this procedure in the past year?
  4. What is your complication rate?
  5. How do you follow a patient post-surgery?
  6. What will my follow-up care look like?
  7. Tell me about your medical team – nurses, physical therapists, and others who can help guide me pre and post-surgery.

There are also rating systems available online, including U.S. News Best Hospitals and Hospital Safety Score. So how do you know which hospital or surgeon is right for you? There is no magic formula, but most experts agree patients should take the time to educate themselves about the doctors and medical facilities they choose.

 

Sources:

Risks Are High at Low-Volume Hospitals” by Steve Sternberg and Geoff Dougherty, U.S. News & World Report, May 18, 2015.

Hospitals Move to Limit Low-Volume Surgeries” by Steve Sternberg, U.S. News & World Report, May 19, 2015.

Elk & Elk Attorneys to Present at NBI Seminar

Elk & Elk Attorneys to Present at NBI Seminar

In the field of personal injury law, it is essential for attorneys and other legal professionals to possess a basic understanding of the human anatomy, types of injuries and common treatment options. An upcoming National Business Institute live seminar featuring presentations from three Elk & Elk attorneys will cover these topics.

Elk & Elk at NBI Seminar

NBI’s “Anatomy and Physiology 101 for Attorneys” will take place on Thursday, June 25, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Hilton Garden Inn Cleveland Downtown. The seminar has been approved by the Ohio Supreme Court Commission on Continuing Legal Education for 6.0 CLE credit hours, and registration is $349 (includes book).

Click here to register.

The course is designed for legal professionals who handle cases related to personal injuries, insurance, workers’ compensation and/or disability, and will offer helpful insight into the medical aspects of common cases.

Attorneys Matthew J. Carty, Michael L. Eisner and R. Craig McLaughlin of Elk & Elk will present the following topics:

Matthew J. Carty

   Head Injuries: 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Michael L. Eisner (presenting with Mary Hahn)

   Shoulder Injuries: 11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

R. Craig McLaughlin (presenting with Lisamarie Pietragallo)

   Hand and Wrist Injuries: 1:15 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Medical Apps for Injury Victims

Forgetting or choosing not to take your medicine is never a good idea, but for injured clients, it’s imperative to follow their medical provider’s care plan. In both personal injury and medical malpractice claims, the validity of an injury may come into doubt if you don’t follow up with your doctor and adhere to all prescribed treatments. During a trial, jurors will question the motives of someone who stopped medical treatment and may assume they do not deserve full compensation for their injuries.

Medication Reminders

Medical apps can help you track your recovery after an injury.Anyone who has multiple prescriptions knows it can be difficult to remember to take medications. The following apps can help make medication compliance easier.

MediSafe helps you manage and take your medication on time and lets you know when it’s time for refills, provides doctor appointment reminders, and provides a place to store doctor phone numbers and addresses. Users also have the option to allow their family, friends and caregivers to help with compliance by being alerted as to whether or not you medication was taken.

MedCoach makes it easy for users to follow their medication and vitamin schedule as prescribed by a doctor. It delivers friendly reminder messages to your phone. The app can even connect you to your pharmacy for prescription refills.

Track Medical Records

Medical expenses are by far the most important component of any personal injury case. Whether your case is settled out of court or decided by a jury, you must have complete medical records to back up your claim.

My Medical™ for iOS is a comprehensive record-keeping app for your personal medical information. My Medical can keep track of medications, surgeries, hospitalizations, tests, physicians, allergies, immunizations, assistive devices and much more. It meets the industry standard Continuity of Care Record format, which makes it easy to transfer records from one system to another. For extra security, data is stored directly to your device and not on a remote server.

Healthspek for iPad allows you to easily track, collect and safely share your personal and family health records, manage medications and store legal documents. Account holders can manage medications, medical charts and images, track vitals, access care, and record physician, insurance and emergency contacts, among other features. With the patient’s permission, doctors can access records through Healthspek’s www.chartnow.com–providing convenience for both you and your physician.

Be cautious of apps that make bold claims

Medical apps abound for consumers looking to use their mobile devices to improve their health and users can easily find apps that promise to promote mental health, aid sleep, cause weight loss, control food allergies, aid self-diagnosis, manage pain, and help in every other conceivable medical condition. However, the FDA regulates consumer health apps at its own discretion, depending on the possible risks to users.

“If an app claims to treat, diagnose or prevent a disease or a health condition, it needs to have serious evidence to back up those claims,” said Mary K. Engle, associate director of the F.T.C.’s division of advertising practices. “We hope marketers will take heed of that and do their homework before they get into the marketplace.”

 


 Elk & Elk Co., Ltd. does not endorse or recommend any commercial products, processes, or services. This information is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure or prevent any disease. All material provided on this Site is provided for information purposes only. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider.

Using Technology to Prevent Bedsores

For millions of Americans, staying in a long-term healthcare facility means an increased risk of developing bedsores. Also known as pressure ulcers, these skin lesions can cause serious and painful infections of the skin, bones and joints. Complications can include tissue and nerve damage, organ failure and even cancer.

Bedsores can be prevented.The best way to prevent pressure sores from occurring is to reposition patients frequently – doctors recommend changing positions every two hours. Unfortunately, with many nursing homes and other long-term healthcare facilities woefully understaffed, many patients are neglected. As a result, more than 2.5 million people in the United States develop pressure ulcers every ear.

Preventing Bedsores with Patient Monitors

An exciting new medical device may hold the answer to this pervasive medical mistake. A company called Leaf Healthcare, Inc. has developed a wearable patient sensor, which can help medical professionals reduce bedsores. Created for healthcare facilities, the Leaf System is comprised of patient sensors and a wireless central monitoring system. The system electronically monitors patients’ position and movements, recording each time a patient is moved and alerting caregivers when patients need to be repositioned.

Leaf Healthcare recently conducted a multiphase clinical trial, which yielded encouraging results. According to a news release, “The study showed that use of the device increased compliance with hospital turn protocols – a standard of care method to prevent pressure ulcers – from a baseline of 64 percent at the start of the trial to 98 percent after the monitoring system was deployed.”

Nursing Home Residents’ Rights

Section 3721.13 of the Ohio Revised Code provides residents of nursing homes with certain rights. Among these is the right to an “adequate and appropriate” level of care, which includes taking steps to prevent bedsores. If you have questions about nursing home neglect or abuse, including whether standards of care are being met, contact our experienced attorneys for a free, confidential case review.

 

*Links to other sites are for informational purposes only. The inclusion of links to other web sites does not imply any endorsement of the material on the web sites or any association with their operators. 

 

Sources:

Tarver, Chris; Schutt, Suann; Pezzani, Michelle. “We’re Sensing You! A Multiphase Clinical Trial Examining Innovative Technology to Improve Patient-Turning Compliance.” [Presentation]. ANCC National Magnet Conference® Dallas, TX. 08 October 2014 to 10 October 2014.

 Leaf Healthcare, Inc., (16 Oct. 2014). “Study Shows Leaf Healthcare Wearable Sensor Dramatically Improves Compliance with Pressure-Ulcer Prevention Efforts.” [Press Release]. [Accessed 28 Oct. 2014].

5 Birth Injuries for Which You May be Entitled to Legal Compensation

Close-up of a newbornAlthough some birth defects occur due chromosomal abnormalities or genetics, others can birth injuries, which are the result of poor prenatal care or medical malpractice. Your baby may suffer from lifelong physical, emotional and mental issues as a result of the negligence of a healthcare provider that you trusted. In such a case, working with a medical malpractice attorney may help you get compensation under the law for your baby’s injuries.

Here are five common birth injuries for which you may be entitled to compensation:

Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy is caused by a lack of oxygen to the baby’s brain during delivery, and it can lead to life-long mental retardation or even cerebral palsy. As many as 9,000 newborns suffer from this condition each year.

Brachial Plexus Injuries

The brachial plexus is a bundle of nerves around the shoulder. A brachial plexus injury occurs when the nerves are damaged during delivery. Sometimes this occurs when the baby becomes stuck in the birth canal, usually the shoulder getting stuck on the pelvic bone. When the baby is pulled out with a vacuum or forceps, or is pushed out by the mother, it can stretch or tear brachial plexus. Since  these nerves control movement and feeling in the arm, damage to the nerves can result in long-term paralysis.

Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy involves a variety of neurological disorders that permanently impair movement or muscle function. Lack of oxygen to the brain due to improper monitoring of the fetal heart rate and other poor choices made by healthcare providers during labor and delivery can lead to one of the neurological disorders that is behind cerebral palsy.

Erb’s Palsy

Also known as Erb-Duchenne Palsy, Erb’s palsy is also caused by damage to the brachial plexus nerves and can lead to long-term paralysis. The condition can also be caused by shoulder injuries during childbirth.

Broken Bones

A difficult birth can also lead to broken bones in a newborn. Improper management of labor and delivery can cause the baby to be stuck in a bad position or to be handled too roughly, leading to the injuries.

If your baby has suffered one of these injuries and you believe it to be the result of negligent care, call an experienced malpractice attorney to discuss your case. Children with birth injuries frequently require a lifetime of special care.